Staff from Environment America’s many state affiliates across the country were packing their bags for a March 9 trip to Washington, DC. Each of them was gearing up for a big push to fully fund our public lands. Of course, it turned out the timing couldn’t have been worse. With the dangers caused by the novel coronavirus, we cancelled flights and lodging and were forced to come up with a Plan B.

As people in my hometown of Madison, Wisconsin, and across the United States brace for weeks of school closures and social distancing, I am searching for ways to make the most of this challenging period. While our own health, essential needs, and family care arrangements are top of mind, we are also staring down the inevitability of long stretches of boredom. I’d love to help my step-kids fill this time by learning about the planet and how to protect it. So I asked my colleagues at Environment America to help me come up with a list of ideas.

When Oxford Dictionaries chooses “climate emergency” as the word of the year for 2019, you know things are changing. Our children are inheriting a world vastly different and more dangerous than the one we grew up in, and we need to act on climate now. 

When Oxford Dictionaries chooses “climate emergency” as the word of the year for 2019, you know things are changing. Our children are inheriting a world vastly different and more dangerous than the one we grew up in, and we need to act on climate now. 

Yet as world leaders meet in Madrid this week to discuss progress towards cutting global warming pollution and hitting the targets of the historic international Paris Agreement, President Trump has vowed to pull our country out. 

The video provides visceral imagery of the suffering caused by single-use plastic. Marine animals, like this turtle, ...do not deserve to suffer extraordinary pain because of the vast quantities of disposable plastic products that end up in the sea.