News Release | Environment New Jersey Research & Policy Center

‘Time for Turbines’ Event Highlights NJ Progress On Offshore Wind Energy Programs

Just one year after the offshore wind industry announced it was “back in business” in New Jersey, and eight years after the state passed its historic OWEDA offshore wind energy bill, top international offshore wind developers, state officials, labor leaders, and environmentalists gathered to celebrate the tremendous progress the industry has made in the last 12 months, and to look forward to the next milestones toward getting “steel in the water” in the Atlantic Ocean off of New Jersey.

News Release | Environment New Jersey Research & Policy Center

Report Says Off-Shore Wind Could Power New Jersey 4x Over

On the eighth anniversary of the Off-Shore Wind Economic Development Act (OWEDA), the winds blowing off the Jersey Shore continue to be the key for New Jersey’s clean, renewable energy future, according to a report, Wind Power to Spare: The Enormous Energy Potential of Atlantic Offshore Wind, released by Environment New Jersey Research & Policy Center, which placed New Jersey as uniquely positioned to harness the wind.

News Release | Environment New Jersey Research & Policy Center

Trump Administration To Carjack EPA Clean Car Standards, Attempt To Eliminate Ability of New Jersey & Other Clean Car States To Set Stronger Emission Standards

The Trump administration announced new vehicle emission guidelines which roll back the existing Clean Car Standards, betraying the Environmental Protection Administration (EPA)’s stated mission of protecting human health and the environment. If fully implemented, this regressive move would eliminate our nation’s best climate change mitigation program, which is cutting future carbon emissions more effectively than any other federal policy.

News Release | Environment New Jersey Research & Policy Center

New Interactive Map Reveals Threats to the Delaware River Watershed

 Environment New Jersey Research & Policy Center today unveiled a first-of-its-kind interactive map of the Delaware River watershed.  The map allows journalists, policymakers, and citizens to pinpoint pollution sources and consider common-sense solutions to address them. The product of a year-and a half effort, the map draws on more than 5,000 data points from over a dozen sources to major pollution threats in the basin, including: 1) runoff from agriculture and impervious surfaces; 2) 660+ industrial sources; 3) 250+ sewage treatment plants; and 4) fossil fuel infrastructure such as pipelines, abandoned coal mines, and refineries.  The map allows the public to see pollution sources in their neighborhood, as well as those upstream.

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